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Mobile C-Arm Enhances Intra-Operative 3D Imaging

By Medimaging International staff writers
Posted on 08 Nov 2017
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Image: The Cios Spin mobile flat detector C-arm (Photo courtesy of Siemens Healthineers).
Image: The Cios Spin mobile flat detector C-arm (Photo courtesy of Siemens Healthineers).
A mobile flat detector C-arm helps orthopedic and trauma surgeons achieve greater precision and improved treatment results.

The Siemens Healthineers (Erlangen, Germany) Cios Spin mobile C-arm is equipped with flat panel detector technology and a range of software packages that ensure efficient integration of intra-operative three dimensional (3D) imaging into the surgical workflow, thus providing an anatomically precise view of the target bone or implant, which can also be rotated on-screen using a mouse. The 25 kilowatt high generator power of Cios Spin helps deal with the challenge of X-raying high density sections of the body (such as the hip), or obese patients.

If, for example, screws need to be repositioned, the surgeons can see this while the operation is still in progress, and can make the adjustments directly. As surgical interventions may often require the use of ten or more screws, all of which must be localized in the 3D dataset before the surgeon can assess them, a "Screw Scout" feature enables Cios Spin software to recognize screws in the 3-D image automatically and labels their position, saving time and effort for the surgeon. Cios Spin is also provided with an antimicrobial coating that prevents bacteria from proliferating on the system parts.

“We are proud of Cios Spin, a mobile 3D C-arm that illustrates our know-how in mobile X-ray imaging,” said Peter Seitz, Head of Surgery at Siemens Healthineers. “Cios Spin will do even more to help our customers improve the quality of their patient care in the future using precision medicine, as well as reducing the additional costs imposed by revision surgery.”

Conventional 2D imaging can make it difficult to get minimally invasive surgery right the first time, and often requires post-operative computed tomography (CT) to reveal if all implants or repositioned bone fragment are in exactly the right place. If not, revision surgery is often needed.


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