We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.
18 May 2021 - 21 May 2021

Researchers Use AI to Detect Wrist Fractures

By MedImaging International staff writers
Posted on 27 Apr 2021
Print article
Illustration
Illustration
An automated system that uses artificial intelligence (AI) is effective at detecting a common type of wrist fracture on X-rays, according to a study.

Researchers at the Jeroen Bosch Hospital ('s-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands) and Jheronimus Academy of Data Science ('s-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands) who developed the AI-derived algorithm said that it could help speed diagnosis and allow earlier treatment.

Scaphoid fractures are injuries to one of the small bones of the wrist that typically occur when people try to break a fall with their hands. They comprise up to 7% of all skeletal fractures. Prompt diagnosis is important, as the fracture may fail to heal properly if untreated, leading to a host of problems like arthritis and even loss of function. Conventional X-ray is the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing scaphoid fractures, but it is often limited by overlap of the scaphoid with the surrounding bones of the wrist. Variations in wrist positioning and X-ray technique can also limit the visibility of fractures.

To overcome this, the researchers studied a system that could aid radiologists in detecting these common fractures. The system is based on deep learning with a convolutional neural network, a sophisticated type of AI that is capable of discerning subtle patterns in images beyond the capabilities of the human eye. While previous research has found that a convolutional neural network was inferior to human observers at identifying scaphoid fractures on X-rays, the new study used larger datasets and further algorithm refinements to improve detection. It also employed class activation maps, which are AI tools that help users understand what region of the image is influencing the network’s predictions. The researchers used thousands of conventional X-rays of the hand, wrist and scaphoid to develop the system.

They tested it on a dataset of 190 X-rays and compared its performance to that of 11 radiologists. The system had a sensitivity of 78% for detecting fractures with a positive predictive value of 83%, which refers to the likelihood that patients the AI identifies as having a fracture really do have one. Analysis showed that the system performed comparably to the 11 radiologists. The class activation maps were found to overlap with fracture lines in the scaphoid, suggesting they could be used for localizing potential fractures. The researchers plan to expand the scaphoid fracture detection system so that it can combine multiple X-ray views for its predictions. They are also conducting an experimental study in which radiologists are asked to identify scaphoid fractures on X-rays with and without the aid of the fracture detection system. The researchers hope to extend the system to fracture detection in other bone structures.

The system has significant potential in clinical use as it could reduce the incidence and costs of additional imaging exams and unnecessary therapy, speed up diagnosis and allow earlier treatment. The system may be able to assist residents, radiologists or other physicians by acting either as a first or second reader, or as a triage tool that helps prioritize worklists, potentially reducing the risk of missing a fracture. Such assistance could prevent delayed therapy and reduce complications that may lead to a subpar clinical outcome, according to the researchers.

“The convolutional neural network may also reduce unnecessary wrist immobilization, performed out of precaution, in more than half of the patients with clinical suspicion for having a scaphoid fracture,” said study lead author Nils Hendrix.

Related Links:
Jeroen Bosch Hospital
Jheronimus Academy of Data Science



Print article
Radcal
CIRS

Channels

Copyright © 2000-2021 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.