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New Interventional Oncology Research Program Launched

By Medimaging International staff writers
Posted on 20 Jun 2016
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Image: The new cancer research program will explore image-guided therapies, and new diagnostic imaging and informatics solutions (Photo courtesy of Yale School of Medicine).
Image: The new cancer research program will explore image-guided therapies, and new diagnostic imaging and informatics solutions (Photo courtesy of Yale School of Medicine).
One of the world’s largest international medical imaging companies has entered into a new cancer research program with leading innovators to explore innovative image-guided therapies, and diagnostic imaging and informatics solutions.

The new multi-year program is part of an existing master research agreement with a leading medical school, and is intended to help find ways to improve cancer care using medical imaging for localization and quantification of the disease, therapy planning, and treatment guidance and assessment.

The agreement is between Royal Philips (Amsterdam, the Netherlands) and the Yale School of Medicine (New Haven, CT, USA).

Philips develops and manufactures diagnostic imaging equipment including Computed Tomography (CT), ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners, image-guided therapy solutions, and related health informatics solutions for the acquisition, integration, and analysis of the data.

Prof. Geschwind, chair of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale School of Medicine, said, "Over the past few years there have been significant developments in image-guided therapy to locally treat tumors, with the result that interventional oncology procedure volumes have grown rapidly. However, the biggest remaining challenge is that it is difficult to predict the effectiveness of the procedure. Together with Philips, we are embarking on a new multi-year research program with the aim to redefine and standardize this type of minimally-invasive treatment to achieve more predictable and better controlled procedure outcomes, and ultimately enhanced patient care.”

Related Links:
Royal Philips
Yale School of Medicine


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