We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.

Coronary CTA Using DLR and Subtraction Technique Reduces Radiation Exposure, Improves Image Quality

By MedImaging International staff writers
Posted on 12 Aug 2022
Print article
Image: Deep learning, subtraction technique has been found optimal for coronary stent evaluation by CTA (Photo courtesy of Pexels)
Image: Deep learning, subtraction technique has been found optimal for coronary stent evaluation by CTA (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Coronary CTA with hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) is prone to false-positive results for in-stent restenosis due to stent-related blooming artifact. Now, a new study has found that the combination of deep-learning reconstruction (DLR) and a subtraction technique yielded optimal diagnostic performance for the detection of in-stent restenosis by coronary CTA.

The study was conducted by researchers at Peking Union Medical College Hospital (Beijing, China) to assess the impact of DLR, subtraction images, and combination of DLR and subtraction images on diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detection of in-stent restenosis. Between March 2020 and August 2021, the research team studied 30 patients (22 men, 8 women; mean age, 63.6 years) with a total of 59 coronary stents who underwent coronary CTA using the two-breath-hold technique (i.e., non-contrast and contrast-enhanced acquisitions). Conventional and subtraction images were reconstructed for hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) and DLR, while maximum visible in-stent lumen diameter was measured. Two readers independently evaluated images for in-stent restenosis (≥50% stenosis). A simulated assessment of combined conventional and subtraction images was generated, reflecting assessment of conventional and subtraction images in the presence or absence of severe misregistration artifact, respectively. Invasive angiography served as reference standard.

The researchers found that ultimately, coronary CTA using DLR and subtraction technique - with a combined (conventional and subtraction images) interpretation - yielded PPV, NPV, and accuracy for in-stent restenosis for reader 1 of 73.3%, 93.2%, and 88.1%, and for reader 2 of 75.0%, 84.3%, and 83.1%, respectively. Noting that these findings could guide patient selection for invasive coronary stent evaluation, combining DLR with a two-breath-hold subtraction technique “may help overcome challenges related to stent-related blooming artifact,” according to corresponding author Yi-Ning Wang. Acknowledging that the two-breath-hold subtraction technique requires an additional non-contrast acquisition (and thus a higher radiation dose), “DLR allows a reduction in radiation exposure, while improving image quality,” wrote the authors.

Related Links:
Peking Union Medical College Hospital 

Gold Supplier
Ultrasound Transducer/Probe Cleaner
Transeptic Cleaning Solution
New
Hand-Held Bidirectional Vascular Doppler
Bidop 7
New
POC Ultrasound System
Acclarix AX3
Air Displacement Plethysmography System
BOD POD

Print article
Radcal

Channels

MRI

view channel
Image: MRI scan showing the fetus and placental compartments (Photo courtesy of WUSTL)

New MRI Method Automatically Detects Placental Health during Pregnancy

Early monitoring of the placenta can improve detection and prevention of pregnancy complications, such as preterm birth, fetal growth disorders and preeclampsia. Currently, standard MRI analysis methods... Read more

Ultrasound

view channel
Image: The new Clarius MSK AI model speeds up diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries (Photo courtesy of Clarius)

Handheld MSK Ultrasound Scanner Uses AI to Automatically Identify and Measure Tendons in Foot, Ankle and Knee

An artificial intelligence (AI) application for musculoskeletal (MSK) imaging that works with handheld point-of-care ultrasound devices automatically identifies, highlights, and measures tendon structures... Read more

Nuclear Medicine

view channel
Image: Tracking radiation treatment in real time promises safer, more effective cancer therapy (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Real-Time 3D Imaging Provides First-of-Its-Kind View of X-Rays Hitting Inside Body During Radiation Therapy

Radiation is used in treatment for hundreds of thousands of cancer patients each year, bombarding an area of the body with high energy waves and particles, usually X-rays. The radiation can kill cancer... Read more

Imaging IT

view channel
Image: The new Medical Imaging Suite makes healthcare imaging data more accessible, interoperable and useful (Photo courtesy of Google Cloud)

New Google Cloud Medical Imaging Suite Makes Imaging Healthcare Data More Accessible

Medical imaging is a critical tool used to diagnose patients, and there are billions of medical images scanned globally each year. Imaging data accounts for about 90% of all healthcare data1 and, until... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2023 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.