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Mobile X-Ray System Takes Digital Technology to Point-of-Care

By Medimaging International staff writers
Posted on 14 Oct 2013
Image: The GE Optima XR220 AMX digital mobile X-ray system. Enhancements over its earlier version include sophisticated digital imaging, more power in a compact design, no boot-up required, and automatic charging (Photo courtesy of GE Healthcare).
Image: The GE Optima XR220 AMX digital mobile X-ray system. Enhancements over its earlier version include sophisticated digital imaging, more power in a compact design, no boot-up required, and automatic charging (Photo courtesy of GE Healthcare).
A next-generation, self-contained, battery-operated mobile radiographic digital X-ray imaging system is designed for performing radiographic exams at the point-of-care when it is not safe enough or suitable to move the patient to the radiography room.

Based on GE Healthcare’s (Chalfont St. Giles, UK) AMX range of mobile X-ray systems, OptimaXR220amx is a new, portable system with wireless FlashPad, a next-generation wireless digital detector. The user gains the productivity, image quality, and functionality of a radiology room at the point of care.

The Optima XR220amx enhancements over its predecessor include 24/7 availability—the system remains on standby and is ready to work even while charging. No boot-up is required. Uninterrupted work results from the Smart Charge automatic-charging algorithms; the system can recharge and continue taking exposures. The wireless digital detector, FlashPad, automatically charges while stowed in its bin so that technologists can maintain focus on patient care. The system also provides abundant storage, with plentiful space to store tape, pens, wipes, markers, with roomy storage trays. The detector FlashPad utilizes a carbon-fiber housing that protects an internal floating sub-assembly to help make it durable.

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