Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
Ampronix
ElsMed
Schiller

Hidden Data Behind Imaging Scans for Cancer May offer New Radiotherapy Strategies

By Medimaging International staff writers
Posted on 30 Jul 2014
Information hidden in imaging tests could help clinicians more effectively choose the radiation therapy dose needed to kill tumors, suggests a study of more than 300 cancer patients.

The research, to be presented at the 56th annual meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), held during July 28 to August 1, 2014, in Austin, TX, USA, is the largest study to date to use radiomics—extracting statistical data from images and other measurements—to help predict the probable progression of cancer or its response to treatment based on positron emission tomography (PET) imaging scans of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and head and neck cancer.

“Currently, there is a one-size-fits-all process for selecting radiation therapy doses, which might be too much for some patients and not enough for others,” said Joseph Deasy, PhD, senior author of the study and chair of the department of medical physics at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (New York, NY, USA). “Radiomics will help us know when we can turn down the treatment intensity with confidence, knowing we can still control the disease.”

In the study, researchers performed PET scanning in 163 non-small-cell lung cancer patients and 174 head and neck cancer patients before and after treatment. They extracted a range of information from each tumor, including the intensity value of the PET image, the roughness of the image, and other information, such as how round the tumor was. In PET, the brighter an area is, the higher the intensity, revealing that the tumor is consuming a greater amount of energy from the injected radioactive glucose substitute tracer.

Comparing the data gathered from the before and after scans to how the patient fared—including whether the tumor shrank or how long the patient survived—researchers can create models that will help direct future therapy. In this study, for instance, researchers determined that lung tumors that have a higher uptake of the tracer need to be treated with a higher dose of radiation than is typically prescribed.

“Standard protocol today is to only use PET imaging to define the extent of a tumor to be treated,” said Dr. Deasy. “Based on the information from this study, the data would be extracted from those images and put into models that would tell the physician what dose was required to kill the tumor with a high probability.” He noted that radiomics is a team effort that requires good collaboration between physicians, physicists, and computer scientists.

Related Links:

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center



Channels

Radiography

view channel

Program Devised to Supply Radiology Departments with Advanced Digital Radiography Systems

A program is designed to provide hospitals an avenue to upgrade their technology, while maximizing their existing investment. The program includes novel solutions to keep systems and technology up-to-date. Program allows imaging facilities to advance at their speed and budget from computed radiography (CR) using conventional... Read more

MRI

view channel
Image: The ScanMed PROCURE wearable MRI prostate coil (Photo courtesy of ScanMed).

World’s First Wearable Prostate Coil Facilitates Simple and Accurate Positioning

A wearable prostate coil has been designed to be similar to wearing a diaper; this specialized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device positions the multiple antenna elements as close as possible to the... Read more

Nuclear medicine

view channel

PET-CT Imaging Forecasts Survival of Lymphoma Better Than Standard Imaging Strategies

Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging is more accurate than traditional CT scanning in gauging response to treatment and predicting survival in patients with follicular lymphoma, and should be used routinely in clinical practice. The findings were published September 18, 2014, in the journal... Read more

General/Advanced Imaging

view channel
Image: From left, Guy Genin, PhD, John Boyle and Stavros Thomopoulos, PhD, watch as a sample is exposed to stress and force. They have developed algorithms that may lead to the ability to identify weak spots in tendons, muscles and bones (Photo courtesy of Washington University in St. Louis).

Image Analysis Algorithms Devised to Find Weak Spots in Muscles, Tendons, and Bones prone to Tearing, Breaking

Researchers have developed algorithms to detect weak spots in muscles, tendons, and bones predisposed to tearing or breaking. The technology, which needs to be further refined before it is used in patients,... Read more

Industry News

view channel

Global Partnership Provides Treatment Planning Support for Modulated Arc Radiotherapy

Varian Medical Systems (Palo Alto, CA, USA) Eclipse treatment planning software can now be used to plan modulated arc radiotherapy (mARC) treatments at sites using Siemens Healthcare (Erlangen, Germany) medical linear accelerators. Varian Medical Systems and Siemens Healthcare presented their range of solutions that... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.