Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
My Account
TeraRecon
Schiller
VIEWORKS

TOF PET Images Offer Improved Detection, Safer for Patients

By Medimaging International staff writers
Posted on 16 Mar 2011
For the first time, quantitative--not qualitative--data analysis has demonstrated that time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging scans can improve cancer detection. Research revealed that oncologic TOF fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET scans yielded considerable improvements in lesion detection of lung and liver cancers over all contrasts and body mass indexes.

Traditional PET scans create images by detecting gamma rays produced by radioisotopes that are injected into the body. Although these conventional scans track where the gamma rays go, they do not gauge the time it takes for each gamma ray to reach the detector. TOF PET scans do take into account the travel time, which results in improved image signal-to-noise.
"[We] …aimed to objectively quantify the improvement in lesion detection that can be achieved with whole-body TOF FDG PET,” said Dr. Joel S. Karp, from the department of radiology, University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, USA), and one of the authors of the study, which was published in the March 2011 issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine. "In contrast with previously published studies that reported comparison of TOF and non-TOF PET using simulated data or measured data with physical phantoms, this study used whole-body patient data...”

To create a lesion-present-clinical-study while ensuring precise knowledge of the presence and location of each lesion, 10-mm spheric lesions were added to disease-free bed positions, yielding fused lesion-present studies. These studies appropriately corrected for the body's attenuation so that the presence or absence of the lesions was similar to that of actual patient studies. TOF PET scans were performed, and researchers used a numeric observer--as opposed to a human observer--to identify quickly a large number of conditions. The TOF PET images were compared to traditional PET images (the same data reconstructed without TOF information) to determine improvement in lesion detection as a function of lesion location, scan time, contrast and body mass index.

Improved lesion detection was seen in the TOF PET scans, with the greatest gains achieved in the shortest-acquisition studies and in the subjects with a BMI of 30 or more. Also of interest--the greatest gain in performance was achieved at the lowest lesion contrast and the smallest gain in performance at the highest lesion contrast.

Nuclear medicine technologists and physicians may be able to take advantage of the gain achieved with TOF PET to reduce scanning time, therefore increasing patient comfort and minimizing patient motion. They may also be able to reduce the injected radiopharmaceutical dose, thereby reducing the exposure of patients and health professionals to radiation.

Related Links:

University of Pennsylvania





Channels

Radiography

view channel
Image: A 3x4 CMOS sensor array records the X-ray image (Photo courtesy of Alain Herzog /EPFL).

New X-Ray Diagnostic Imaging Equipment to Meet Needs of Developing Countries

The Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL; Paris, France) has revealed a fully functional prototype of a high-tech, low-cost X-ray imaging device designed specifically for use in developing countries.... Read more

MRI

view channel
Image: High-definition MRI of water diffusion for studies of Traumatic Brain Injury (Photo courtesy of Sudhir Pathak & Walter Schneider/University of Pittsburgh).

Novel MRI Technique Can Help Diagnose Traumatic Brain Injuries

A new, advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique that can help detect subtle Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) has been developed by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST;... Read more

Ultrasound

view channel

Portable Ultrasound Saves Lives in Remote Rural Central America

According to the World Health Organization (WHO; Geneva, Switzerland) over 60% of the world’s population has no access to diagnostic medical imaging such as ultrasound. To address the problem, Floating Doctors, a nonprofit, humanitarian organization in rural Central America and Haiti, uses open boats to provide healthcare... Read more

General/Advanced Imaging

view channel
Image: Measuring the Magnetic Activity in the Brain of a Child, Using a MEG machine. (Photo courtesy of Children\'s Hospital of Philadelphia).

Study Suggests Language Delay Linked to Chromosome Deletion in Children with Neurological Disorders

A study found that children with neuro-developmental problems born with DNA duplications or deletions on part of chromosome 16, show measurable delays in their ability to process sound and language.... Read more

Imaging IT

view channel
Image: Schematic of the Virtual Multi-Site PACS (Photo courtesy of Carestream).

Shared Multisite Virtual PACS from Ten Individual PACS/RIS Systems Developed

The Cheshire and Merseyside districts in the UK have merged ten Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) and Radiology Information Systems (RIS) into one shared multi-site virtual PACS.... Read more

Industry News

view channel

Analysis of Worldwide CT Scanner Sector Released

A report by Kalorama Information (New York, NY, USA) analyzing the global Computed Tomography (CT) market has been published. The report surveyed the CT market outlook until 2018, and the drivers behind the changes. The report investigated CT market sizing, market forecast to 2018, analysis of trends, how the market... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2015 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.